Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Staff Sgt. Matthew Minnillo, 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather technician, researches tropical storm Harvey as it approaches Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. Each weather Airman closely watch weather patterns because a storm can change direction, speed and severity very quickly. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Airmen from the 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather flight study tropical storm Harvey as it approaches Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. The weather flight monitors how fast the storm is moving, how much rain it’s producing, and the direction it’s headed in order to inform base commanders and residents. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Staff Sgt. Tyreese Clark, 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather technician, monitors tropical storm Harvey as it approaches Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. Wind and rain has to be monitored as it may cause millions of dollars worth, of damage to a B-52 Stratofortress. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Staff Sgt. Tyreese Clark, 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather technician, monitors tropical storm Harvey as it approaches Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Staff Sgt. Matthew Minnillo, 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather technician, researches tropical storm Harvey as it approaches Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. The storm started along Texas’ coast in Houston and slowly made its way northeast. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Shown is the occupational badge for Airmen in the weather career field. These Airmen are involved in collecting, analyzing and disseminating weather information, including forecasts of weather conditions in the atmosphere and space. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

Team Barksdale monitors Tropical Storm Harvey

Airman 1st Class Sarah Ramos, 2nd Operations Support Squadron weather apprentice, studies different weather patterns that could affect Barksdale Air Force Base, La., Aug. 29, 2017. Barksdale can receive tropical storms, tornadoes, flash floods and occasionally hurricanes. (U.S. Air Force Photo/Airman 1st Class Sydney Campbell)

BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La. --

Barksdale Air Force Base is expected to receive the back side effects of Tropical Storm Harvey between Aug. 30 through Sept. 1. The level 4 hurricane has been downgraded to a tropic storm after hitting Houston this past week, leaving the city flooded.

Tropical Storm Harvey is expected to drop between 1 and 4inches of rain on the local Shreveport and Bossier City Area. The 26th Operational Support Squadron weather flight said a forecast of wind speeds up to 39 mph is expected.

Preparation have been made to notify Team Barksdale if more than 2 inches of rain in less than three ours is expected.

“Six inches of fast-moving water can knock over a human,” said Capt. Amanda Sink, 26th OWS weather flight commander. “A regular-sized car can be knocked over with just 12 inches of water. That is why it is so important to not drive through water. If you cannot see the road, just turn around. ‘Turn around, don’t drown’ is a precaution to remember during hurricane season. If you cannot see the road, do not drive through it.

The hurricane season tends to last between June and November, the peak being between August and October.

The 2nd Bomb Wing safety flight is asking base residents to take the appropriate safety measures and know where to find relevant weather related information.

“Make sure to listen to all local leadership,” said Richard Knowles, 2nd Bomb Wing deputy chief of wing safety. “Listen to law enforcement and first responders’ direction. Listening to them will help you know what to do.”

Harvey is not expected to cause much damage to the local area, but following weather forecasts and having a plan will help residents be prepared.

For weather updates, call the 26th OWS weather flight at 456-3136.