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509th BW supports Operation Odyssey Dawn

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE A B-2 Stealth bomber returns from a mission March 20, 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kenny Holston)(Released)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. - One of three stealthy B-2 Spirit bombers returns from its mission March 20 in support of enforcing the Operation Odyssey Dawn no-fly zone over Libya. The no-fly zone was imposed by the United Nations Security Council resolution 1973 authorizing military action. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kenny Holston)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE A B-2 Stealth bomber returns from a mission March 20, 2011. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kenny Holston)(Released)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. - One of three stealthy B-2 Spirit bombers returns from its mission March 20 in support of enforcing the Operation Odyssey Dawn no-fly zone over Libya. The no-fly zone was imposed by the United Nations Security Council resolution 1973 authorizing military action. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kenny Holston)

BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La. -- Sometime after noon CDT on March 20, three Air Force Global Strike Command B-2 Spirit bombers returned to home base after striking targets in support of the international response which is enforcing a no-fly zone over Libya.

The B-2s landed at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., after a more than 25-hour mission in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.

The bombers employed 45 guided Joint Direct Attack Munitions, each weighing 2,000 pounds, against hardened aircraft shelters in Libya.

A no-fly zone was imposed by the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1973, authorizing military action in order to ensure the protection of the Libyan people and compliance with the conditions of UNSCR 1973.

Eighth Air Force's 608th Air Operations Center at Barksdale coordinated four aerial refuelings for the three B-2s during the mission. The Air Operations Center coordinated the smooth transition of command and control between Global Strike Command and U.S. Africa Command as the aircraft flew from the continental United States to African air space and back.

The goal of coalition strikes is to reduce the Libyan regime's ability to defy the no-fly zone and to enhance protection of coalition air forces charged with implementing it.